Personality turn-offs that could cost you a contract

Behaviours that could cost you a contract

While it’s popular to say “you do you”, this may not be the case if you’re in an interview situation.

In fact, a recent report from CV-Library and TopCV (based on a survey of 200 employers) found that a huge 75% believe that personality is the most important factor when considering someone for a job, whether that be as a contractor or as a permanent employee. Just to put it in perspective, that’s compared to those who believed it was education (13%) or appearance (12%).

So, you could have all the skills and education, but if there’s a clash of personalities, you could well lose out on the contract.

Personality no-no’s

According to the report there is a top ten of personality turn-offs that are almost guaranteed to get you taken off the recruitment shortlist. These are:

  • Arrogance
  • Dishonesty
  • Being unreliable
  • Close-mindedness
  • Being immoral
  • Ignorance
  • A sense of entitlement
  • Self-centredness
  • A short temper
  • Cruelty

The list of the most favoured personality traits is somewhat self-explanatory. It includes being reliable, having confidence, honesty, being honourable, loyalty, friendliness, and being self-disciplined.

Careers Expert at TopCV, Amanda Augustine, had this to say on the results of the survey: “Historically, assessing job seekers was contingent on two factors – experience and skills – but our new survey reveals that more intangible qualities, such as personality, are determining which candidates rise to the top.”

Of course, the fact that personality traits are intangible can mean it comes down to personal preference, but there are things you can to do make sure you’re at an advantage.

How to make sure you come across at your best

When bidding for a contract, you have a relatively small space of time to convince the hiring manager that you’re the right person for this project. As well demonstrating your experience and skills, you also need to use the time to show off your sparkling personality. So, what do you need to do?

  • Tread the fine line between selling yourself and coming across as arrogant and entitled
  • Be open, transparent and honest
  • Arrive in plenty of time and prepare anything you said you would
  • Show yourself to be open-minded and well-informed
  • Be kind, polite and pleasant – it costs nothing

While this might seem obvious to most people, it’s easy to get carried away in an interview environment, especially with the race-to-the-bottom business culture so often demonstrated on the likes of LinkedIn and in popular culture. It’s not necessary to be an awful person in order to get ahead and, as this report shows, it can actually damage your chances in very real terms.

 

Of course, there are other things that can also damage your chances at securing a contract and not having the correct contractor insurance is one of them. If you’re ready for renewal or need to buy for the first time, our expert team can help. Simply call 01242 808740.

How to be assertive as a contractor

How to be more direct at work

Here at Kingsbridge Contractor Insurance, we recently had a conversation with an IT contractor that gave us insight into a scenario that we think may be fairly commonplace. How to be assertive when contracting.

The contractor told us that a couple of projects she had recently worked on had overrun past their deadline due to her clients holding things up internally. This was due to things like long turnaround times on sign-offs, delays in providing information and other hold-ups. She said she felt as if she should have pushed back to her clients, reminding them of the deadlines and asking them to speed things up. However, she didn’t feel confident to do this as she is a contractor and didn’t feel she had the same influence as a permanent employee.

So, we’re here to tell you what we told her: never be afraid to be assertive.

 

Read more

The pros and cons of flexible workspaces

Flexible Workspaces

Not that long back, not working from the office meant, instead, working from home or, maybe, a library. Then came the coffee shops with their free WiFi and the idea of more flexible workspaces began to gather pace, cumulating in the more formal co-working spaces now available in most cities across the UK. These offer WiFi, food services, printing facilities, meeting rooms, virtual office services and the company of other freelancers, and latest research has shown that these workspaces are growing in popularity with no sign of tailing off.

Contractor Umbrella reports that forecasts suggest there will soon be more than 20,000 co-working spaces globally and this number will reach 25,968 by 2022. That’s 56% growth in 2018 alone and an average of 2,500 new spaces popping up per year since 2015. Last year, a new flexible workspace opened in London every five days.

But what are the pros and cons of using these spaces?

Read more

Why the freelance creative sector is thriving

Creative Freelancers

It’s official. The UK’s creative sector is thriving after £1.1 billion in support from the Government in the form of tax reliefs.

Award-winning, water-cooler-moment TV series Killing Eve is just one such to benefit from them, and since they were introduced 2,955 films, 485 TV productions and 1,075 videogames have also benefitted. Meanwhile museums and galleries have benefitted from an exhibitions tax relief that has allowed them to host 300 exhibitions across the country.

Read more

More and more young people are looking to self-employment

Young Self Employed

Contracting is often thought of the arena of people further on in their careers, when they’ve built networks and gained enough experience to be considered experts in their field. However, that looks set to change with recent research by AAT and Survation revealing that 43% of 16-24 year olds have the ambition to set up their own business during their working life.

Read more

Fall into better habits

Fall Into Better Habits

It was the Autumnal Equinox on 23 September and with children returning to school and a general feeling of new starts everywhere, what better time to reassess your habits and fall (ahem!) into better ones? By habits we do, of course, mean your freelancer habits which, let’s face it, can easily become neglected. And once they’re neglected, they can actually become a hindrance to your freelance business.

So, which habits likely need a look at and what should best practice look like? The Kingsbridge team has put together some of the ones we hear about most often.

Read more

Employing your partner: What you need to know

Employing a Partner

It’s fairly commonplace these days for contractors to employ their spouse or partner to assist them – often in an administrative role. It makes sense on a number of levels:

  • The admin work (bookkeeping, filing, schedule planning, invoice chasing, etc.) that you would otherwise have to do in your spare time can be done by someone else during work hours, freeing up time for your whole family.
  • It means these tasks can be done from your home, rather than you having to provide an office space for someone else to work.
  • It can provide significant tax benefits as it transfers some of your income to your partner. If he or she pays tax at a lower rate than you do, or if they have unused personal tax allowance, this is likely to create a tax saving for you and your household.

Read more

How can contractors prepare for Brexit?

Contractor Brexit

We’d understand if this is seen by some of you as a trick question. After all, when no one, right down to the Prime Minister, seems to have the foggiest idea what’s going on from one day to the next, how is the average contractor meant to be able to prepare?

Well, even in the midst of all the Brexit uncertainty, believe it or not, there are still things you can do. But, first, let’s take a look at what’s changed for contractors already since the 2016 referendum.

Read more

What does trust mean as a contractor?

Customer Trust

We recently saw a report on a survey compiled by CV-Library which revealed the most and least trusted professions in the UK. 1,200 UK workers were surveyed and the results were intriguing.

Most trusted

  1. Doctor (61.3%)
  2. Nurse (40%)
  3. Teacher (36.9%)
  4. Paramedic (36.5%)
  5. Police (23.2%)
  6. Armed forces (20.8%)
  7. Vet (16%)
  8. Scientist (14.3%)
  9. Judge (13.2%)
  10. Hairdresser (8.4%)

It seems that we associate trust with professions that are there to protect our best interests (73.4%), are there for a good cause (71%), are reliable (64.5%) and are friendly (16.2%). With that in mind, it’s no surprise to see vocational roles topping the list, particularly those based in healthcare, education and law enforcement.

Read more

You can count on Kingsbridge

Customer Reviews

When you’re purchasing contractor insurance, you really are taking a leap of faith. You’re depending on that company to treat you fairly, to not hike up premiums, to help you if you need them to, and to not wriggle out of claims. For these reasons, you need to choose an insurer that’s trustworthy – not just in their own eyes, but in the eyes of their existing customers.

Read more