Fees in the Mortgage Process

Mortgage

We’ve already spoken about the steps self-employed workers should take in order to make the process of getting a mortgage simpler and easier. But it may well be the case that you’re so focused on getting over the first hurdle that you forget what’s just behind it.

That’s why we’ve teamed up with the good people at CMME again – this time to take a look at the fees involved in the mortgage process. Whether you’re a first time buyer with no idea of what’s ahead or a seasoned pro getting ready for another round, this post will serve as a good indicator of what to expect.

Before we begin it’s worth noting that it is possible to add some of these costs to your mortgage, but many individuals choose to pay them upfront. Regardless of which scenario works best for you, here are the fees you can expect:

Read more

Mortgage Tips for the Self-Employed

Mortgage

Read on below for a guest post from our good friends at contractor mortgage specialists CMME:

Becoming self-employed isn’t always for everyone. It’s a decision that can have consequences. You may feel alone in your journey when it comes to financial advice, especially when your high street bank doesn’t understand the way in which you work when applying for a mortgage – something that can hinder your opportunity.

It’s a common myth that the self-employed will be declined a mortgage or would need to have been self-employed for 2 to 3 years. This isn’t necessarily true and, with support and guidance from the right specialist mortgage broker, you could get a mortgage that reflects your true earnings.

Whether you’re a first-time buyer or a professional looking to re-mortgage, CMME have created this helpful guide outlining everything self-employed people need to know about getting a mortgage.

Read more

The Slinky principle – When is the right time to expand your recruitment business?

Recruitment

A guest blog from Boomerang’s Paul Dewick:

Remember Slinky’s? They were essentially a long, very flexible spring that you placed on the top step of a set of stairs. Then you would slowly tip the top of the spring and, assuming you had positioned it right it would gracefully descend the stairs and settle at the bottom in a neat tube. If the positioning was wrong, then they would start well but gradually begin to slip off their centre of gravity and end up in a tangled disaster. In the worst-case scenario, the loops of metal would become irretrievably entangled, and you had to throw it away.

Read more