Contractor News Round-Up

Latest News

This week we’ve scoured web to find all the latest contractor news – stories, trends and research affecting the world of the modern independent professional. Read on to discover our top picks of the latest stories affecting the industry.

More than 80% of new freelancers are female

Freelance UK has this week reported on official labour market figures that claim that more than eight in ten of the people who became self-employed in the final three months of last year were women.  IPSE commented that the 2% rise in the overall number of self-employed people in the UK is almost entirely made up of women. This significant increase has been attributed to the apparent upsurge of women spotting emerging lifestyle trends and going in to business to capitalise on this insight.

If this increase spills over to the worrisome gender gap in the UK’s engineering skills crisis, could we see the start of a close on that divide in the near future?

Read more…

Study reveals freelancers happier and wealthier

Good news for independent professionals from Brighton University this week. City A.M. reports on a study conducted by the university’s business school that found that being your own boss lead to greater levels of job satisfaction and average earnings that far exceed the nation’s average.

There has been much ink spilled about the lifestyle benefits that a freelance lifestyle offers people, including flexibility in working hours and location. We feel that the benefits of freelancing certainly outweigh the perceived negatives. We’ve dealt before with time management and the key issues every freelancer must consider, and the recent swell in self-employed individuals across the UK suggests that many more people are buying into this exciting and dynamic way of life.

Read more…


UK freelancers cautiously optimistic about 2015

The Association of Independent Professionals and the Self Employed (IPSE), in conjunction with Elance-oDesk, the online freelance job marketplace, conducted a freelance confidence survey earlier this year that discovered that freelancers have a cautious optimism about the coming business year

Factors such as the upcoming General Election are thought to influence the way that freelancers feel about their financial and business prospects in 2015. How has your business fared since the coalition government came to power? Do you feel that a change in ruling party would have a significant impact on your prospects for the future?

To read a full, in-depth analysis of the Freelancer Confidence Index, visit the IPSE site here.

Freelancers unite to get sickness and other employment benefits

The Guardian takes an in-depth look at groups springing up across Europe that are seeking to fix the problems that are commonly associated with freelancing, rather than endure the long wait associated with trying to effect political and legal change.

Covering issues such as sickness pay and chasing clients for late payment of invoices, the piece looks at the concept of industry wide mutual support in Europe in comparison to the UK and provides real food for thought at the innovative and unique ways that freelancers find to combat uncertainty while running successful businesses.

Read more here…

Should I get my freelance contract reviewed for IR35 compliance?


IR35 is the legislation on everyone’s lips and it’s a subject that we have covered a number of times.  Since its passing into law in 2000, it’s been a priority for freelancers and contractors to make sure they don’t get caught in the IR35 net.

Some professional organisations now offer independent reviews of your contracts that check for IR35 compliance, giving you the peace of mind from the outset that you are not at risk of being caught out. This week, we’re going to investigate if these contract reviews are really worth it for independent professionals today.

IR35 – the risks

IR35 is aimed at uncovering ‘disguised employment’. This affects people that provide their services through a limited company, known as a personal services company. ‘Disguised employment’ is when a freelancer works on a contract through their limited company, but their working conditions and their contract indicates that they are working in the same way as a traditional employee.

If one of your contracts is caught by IR35 legislation i.e. – your work appears to be more like that of a traditional employee –  your income will then become subject to normal income tax and National Insurance contributions and you will lose the advantage of the low salary, high dividends tax arrangement that many freelancers benefit from.


The Assessment

If you are selected by HMRC to undergo an IR35 compliance investigation they will investigate both your contract and your working arrangements. That means that the way you work and the language of the contract you are working under need to be in agreement.

This is where the skills of a professional contract assessor really come to the rescue for a busy freelancer. Employment status experts will investigate the terms of your contract as well as delving into your working practices through the eyes of an HMRC investigator. That means that you have an objective onlooker examining your compliance for IR35 without you having to get bogged down in the finer details of this often very hard to understand legislation.

This way, you can be secure that both the wording of your contract, and the way in which you actually complete the work in the contract, are compliant with IR35, limiting your exposure to the risks of having an unexamined contract.

This, to us, is the biggest advantage of having an employment status professional review your contract and the way in which your services are delivered. It’s sure to give you peace of mind that a professional can help you prove to HMRC that you’ve taken reasonable steps to IR35-proof your contract.

When HMRC investigate the validity of your contract against the stipulations of IR35 legislation they carry out a series of Business Entity Tests.  These tests function as one of the ways to prove that your contract is at low, medium or high risk of being caught out by IR35.

Being covered by Professional Indemnity (PI) insurance can improve your IR35 stance and forms part of the Business Entity Test. That means that ensuring that you are fully covered as a freelance contractor is a vital step to cover yourself at every level. At Kingsbridge we have designed our core insurance package to cover the risks you’re exposed to as a freelance contractor. This includes Professional Indemnity, Public Liability and Employers’ Liability cover, all at levels that suit the needs of the modern freelancer.

If you wish to discuss your cover requirements then simply call our friendly, professional team at Kingsbridge on 01242 362160 and we will be happy to discuss your needs with you. Or, you can apply online to get access to cover almost instantly.

Five ways to reward yourself after avoiding the self-assessment late penalty

Tax Return UK

It’s the last day before the 31st January self-assessment deadline. That means, for many self-employed and freelance individuals, it’s the last lap before submission of your tax return and final payment of any tax that you owe for the previous financial year.

We’d hedge our bets and say that for many of you the 11:45pm scramble on 31st January is a familiar one as you race against time to get your return submitted and avoid the on the spot £100 fine that 12:00 midnight on 1st February brings.

To inspire you and get you through the last stages of the final slog toward self-assessment freedom, we’ve put together a list of some of our favourite things that you can spend a hard earned £100 on, simply by avoiding submitting your tax return late. After the effort that goes into keeping organised for January, you deserve it!


If you’re someone that benefits from listening to music to aid concentration or to block out background noise while you’re working, a new pair of earphones is always a good investment, whether for business or pleasure.

We love these Skullcandy Crusher headphones, a snip at £89 and with a bass extension driver and built-in amplifier. Or, for a little extra pocket money you could invest in the ubiquitous Beats Solo HD headphones.

3D pen

Do you have latent artistic ability? Would you like to see your creative vision rendered in 3D? Or maybe you just like really cool gadgets that you get to play with. Either way, the 3D pen is a brilliant way to spend a little pocket money. The 3Doodler is the world’s first 3D printing pen that allows you to draw in 3D by projecting heated plastic that cools into a solid structure.

It’s a fun little gadget and could make for some exciting new additions to your desk space!

The iKettle

Do you ever get so busy that you can’t even find 5 minutes to pop the kettle on for a much needed cup of tea? Well, the struggle ends with the iKettle. The world’s first Wi-Fi kettle, you can control the iKettle with your smart phone. Struggling over an impending deadline, yet parched and in need of a cuppa? The iKettle has got your back. Inspired!



If you’re like a large proportion of people, you’ll have resolved to get fitter for the New Year. The Fitbit is an integrated accelerometer. It keeps track of your activity levels, and lets you log fitness goals, calories burned and the hours you’ve slept. What’s more, it comes in a sleek and stylish wristband design. All you need to get your fitness on track for 2015.

Nike Free Runs

If you want to make sure you have something to enter in to your new Fitbit tracker, then you need to get your running shoes on! Why not invest in a treat for your feet with a new pair of Nike Free Run trainers.

Specially designed to adapt to the foot movement and stride of each individual runner, Nike Free Runs are the ultimate in supportive footwear. So, if you’re in need of clearing your head with a run, these are the shoes to carry you further.


Sometimes we all need a little inspiration to help get us through trying times, and the final push toward the self-assessment deadline is no different. Just remember that you don’t want to be hit with a £100 fine that you could be using to make your life a little easier with some of these handy gadgets.

How would you spend the £100 you get to keep by submitting your self-assessment return on time? Let us know in the comments below or get in touch with us on Twitter.

The funniest excuses for late tax returns

Tax Time

For the last few years HMRC has revealed its top ‘oddest’ excuses they receive for the submission of late tax returns. The creativity and, let’s face it, boldness, that’s required to approach HMRC with excuses dragged straight from the ‘dog ate my homework’ school of thought is really something to be marveled at.

From the sublime to the ridiculous, we’ve collected some of our favourite creative excuses published by HMRC in recent years:

  • My pet dog ate my tax return…and all the reminders.

A classic, ‘dog ate my homework’ turn;  it would appear that somebody’s dog has quite the taste for tax returns.

  • I fell in with the wrong crowd.

This is quite an impressive excuse…if you’re a teenager on the brink of being expelled from secondary school. We’re not sure with regard to self-assessment though.

  • I’ve been busy looking after a flock of escaped parrots and some fox cubs.

While a pretty admirable pursuit, we’re not quite sure a flock of parrots counts as a reasonable excuse for filing your tax return late!

  • Our business doesn’t really do anything.

So bold. Almost so bold, in fact, for it to inspire respect. Almost…

  • I was in Australia.

And yet, you still owe tax in the UK!

My Dog Ate My Tax Receipts

But, what is a reasonable excuse?

Tall tales aside, sometimes life events can happen that are far beyond anyone’s control and this, naturally, can affect a freelancer’s ability to successfully complete their self-assessment return. You can appeal certain penalties incurred by late submission of your tax return, as long as you have, what HMRC terms as, a ‘reasonable excuse’.

Reasonable excuses in the eyes of HMRC include:

  • The death of a partner
  • An unplanned hospital stay
  • Computer failure during the process of submitting your tax return
  • Service disruptions on behalf of HMRC
  • A fire
  • Unexpected postal disruptions

In short, a reasonable excuse extends to events that are completely out of your control and that are unexpected. You can find out further details about HMRC’s reasonable excuses here or the tax appeals process here.

Despite the light-heartedness of some of these excuses, it does serve as a good reminder that to file your return sooner rather than later is prudent, as, if you don’t have one of the excuses listed above, you could face financial penalties.

There is an immediate £100 late fine that comes into force at midnight on February 1st. Then if your self-assessment isn’t returned after three months, HMRC will charge daily penalties of £10 per day for a period of up to 90 days. So that’s at least £1,000 in late fees that you’ll face, all for the sake of a hungry dog with a craving for HMRC documents. Doesn’t seem worth it to us.

What are some of the most outrageous excuses you’ve heard for failing to file a tax return? Have you been caught out in a lie? Or do you have any tips or fool proof strategies to avoid having to think of an elaborate excuse in the first place? Let us know in the comments or connect with us via Twitter or our LinkedIn page.

Tools to keep you organised ahead of January’s self-assessment deadline

Don't Miss the Deadline

It’s no secret that January can be a testing time for freelancers. We’ve written before about the pressure to stay organised so that the march to 31st January isn’t a time you face with utter dread every year.

It’s fine to say that you need to be organised, but it can be harder actually doing what you need to. We all need a little help sometimes. That’s why we’ve come up with a list of five of our favourite organisational tools that will help you keep track of time, organise your documents and your finances and make January’s deadline less of a burden on your time.

1.       Dropbox

Dropbox is nearly ubiquitous amongst modern freelancers, especially if you’re embracing the digital revolution as it advances into nearly every aspect of our lives. Syncing all of your devices from phone, to tablet, to laptop, Dropbox ensures that all of your digital documents are accessible anywhere. And if there’s something you need to update or edit, your changes will be saved across all platforms too. An absolute must if organisation is one of your business resolutions this year.

2.       Teux Deux

We don’t know how you feel about “to-do” lists but we love them. They keep us focused, accountable and gives us a great sense of achievement every time we get to cross something off our list!

To-do lists are great for organising your time. This is especially true if you have to give over some of your precious time to organising your tax details in preparation for the all-important 31st January deadline. Teux Deux offers a really simple interface that allows you organise your list of tasks digitally. What’s more, they have an iPhone app that allows you to take your lists with you on the go. Now there really is no reason to go off track.

3.       Central Desktop

If you want to win back some time during the run-up to the self-assessment deadline then Central Desktop could be the perfect way to do it! Now, we all know that the customer (or client) is always right and pleasing them is a top priority for any freelancer. However, sometimes when you’re knee-deep in receipts in your designated self-assessment time a client call, requesting emails or documents, can be the last thing you want to deal with.

With Central Desktop you can create an online collaborative workspace that connects you and your clients. That way, resources such as project plans, agreements and progress reports are stored in the cloud and accessible by you and your clients, removing the need for unnecessary emails and gifting you extra time to focus on the important tasks at hand.


4.       Shoeboxed

What image comes to mind when you think about the task of collecting all of your receipts together before you submit your self-assessment? We’d bet that for a majority of you it would be the frantic dash to fill an old shoebox with crumpled petrol receipts and the bill for a client dinner or two.

Shoeboxed have taken that concept and updated it for the digital generation. Giving you the ability to scan and upload receipts and business cards, Shoeboxed will turn these into expense reports and contact lists. Helping you to cut down on admin time and admin costs, this is one tracking system that could well be a self-assessment game changer.

5.       FreeAgent

FreeAgent is the ultimate accounting tool for the time-starved freelancer. If you’re not so comfortable with accounting (and it’s fair to say that not all of us are) then FreeAgent allows you to organise your expenses and  income by project, so keeping track is easy. Another freelance friendly feature is a one-click report that produces a self-assessment summary that you can copy straight to your tax return. If that’s not a time (and stress) saver, we don’t know what is!

As you can see, it’s always worth embracing what the digital world has to offer in terms of productivity and organisational tools. There are hundreds of different apps, web based programmes and software that can help you keep stress at bay and make sure you’re super organised every January!

What are some of your favourite tools to keep you organised ahead of filling out your self-assessment return? Have we missed anything out? Let us know in the comments below, or get in touch with us on Twitter!

How to avoid January self-assessment stress

31st January

January is well and truly upon us. Most of us have completed our first full week back in work and the challenges of the New Year are facing us.

January holds more significance for freelancers than most, and that’s thanks to the 31st January self-assessment online submission deadline looming large on the horizon. The first month of the year can be stressful for freelance contractors and the self-employed as you rush to collect everything your need to avoid being lumped with a hefty fine if you miss that all important deadline.

If you’re new to the process, or you’re struggling a bit in the organisation department, then read on for some of our top tips to avoid self-assessment stress this month.

Ensure you’re registered

If you’ve just gone freelance then this is an essential step. You only have to register with HMRC once to let them know you need to file a self-assessment. From then you will be reminded by HMRC every year that you need to complete your assessment.

First time registration deadlines are October 5th of the current tax year. Failure to register will incur further fines. However, if you manage to submit your self-assessment in full by the 31st January then you can reduce or even avoid late registration fees.

To successfully register you need to provide your National Insurance number and the details of your company or relevant personal details. When you’ve registered your will receive a Unique Taxpayer Reference number. This is an important piece of information so keep it safe as you will have to use this number on all subsequent self-assessments.

Keep a paper trail

There is nothing worse than the January rush, scrabbling to pull together records and evidence of your finances. It is at this point in the year that it pays to be fastidious and diligent all year round by keeping a water tight record of your incoming and outgoing expenses.

Getting into the practice of collecting business receipts and keeping a log of the relevant business transactions that accompany them is wise. It will prove to be the perfect antidote to the January rush and will make filling out your online self-assessment that little bit easier.

In terms of the type of thing you need to be keeping hold of for your records come this time of year, there really is no limit on what is important and pertinent. One missing statement can cause delays in submitting your self-assessment so it pays to be cautious. You can find a comprehensive guide to keeping documents for tax purposes on HMRC’s website here.

Don't Forget

Don’t leave it too late

This would be a good time to note that leaving your self-assessment too late is likely to cause you unnecessary delays and unwanted fines. Of course, the key to avoiding the hurry is in staying organised and planning well.

If you’re not so hot on forward planning then it’s at this point we should probably mention late penalties. If you miss the 31st January deadline then you’ll be presented with an immediate £100 fine. Not a great start to the year. Further to that, if you leave it another 90 days then you’ll start to accrue a £10 a day penalty on top of the £100 fine. So start early to avoid being cleaned out thanks to late submission!

Don’t be afraid to ask for help

If you want to avoid the flop sweat developing at 11:55pm on 31st January while you curse your lack of book-keeping skills, then it does pay to acquire the help of an accountant. Tax is, by its very nature, a complex beast and any good business person knows how to delegate. If you can keep on top of your records then a recommended accountant should be able to help you when it comes to completing your self-assessment.

There’s plenty to get your teeth into as a freelancer. From chasing clients to drumming up new business and getting your name recognised, there’s always a lot to think about. However, keeping on top of your financial records and making sure you’re fully registered with HMRC is one of the most important things you can do if you want to avoid the pitfalls of a stressed and rushed January.

What methods do you use to avoid the typical January rush to submit your self-assessment return? Are you super organised and early to the self-assessment party or do you take advantage of a good accountant to remove the pressure a bit? Let us know in the comments how you’ll be handling self-assessment stress this year!

A brief history of IR35

Rules Regulations

We’ve written about IR35 before; the tax and National Insurance legislation that affects freelance contractors operating as limited companies. Aimed at uncovering what HMRC terms ‘disguised employment’, it is the legislation on everybody’s lips.

But when and where did IR35 originate and why is it becoming such a key piece of legislation? We’re taking a look back to find out when IR35 entered the political agenda and how it has evolved to become the legislation we know today.


1999. It was the year Prince sung about and Gordon Brown was Chancellor of the Exchequer. As part of the year’s budget, he announced the introduction of measures to crack down on those avoiding tax by working through limited companies while still working in a similar arrangement to a traditional employee.


IR35 became law in April 2000, as part of The Finance Act. The legislation didn’t come in to force until the beginning of the financial year, but the act was backdated. This made its official commencement date 6th April 2000.

Officially known as Intermediaries Legislation, the new regulation came to be commonly known as IR35.

Opposition increases

Since the passing of IR35 into law, the legislation has been hotly debated, garnering much attention and opposition. Several bodies have been particularly vocal in their criticism, including the Professional Contractor Group, a representative organisation for freelance contractors.

Many felt that the legislation was too complex to be applied to a large variety of cases, harmed small companies that weren’t set up for the purpose of avoiding tax and actually enforced higher levels of tax on those found to be within IR35, as they are also liable for Employers National Insurance contributions.

Tax simplification and the coalition government

The Cameron Ministry saw a new Chancellor at number 11 in the shape of George Osborne in May 2010. One of his initial acts as Chancellor of the Exchequer was the creation of the Office for Tax Simplification.

One of the key objectives of the newly formed task force was to put IR35 under review and suggest to Osborne if the legislation should be drastically changed or scrapped altogether. IR35 was deemed far too important to do away with altogether and so a re-vamped version was developed.

The main changes to the law included publishing clear guidelines for freelance contractors, creating a dedicated helpline run by IR35 experts and the creation of a series of business entity tests, designed to provide contractors with an idea of the risks posed should they be selected for an IR35 investigation.

IR35 today

Since the OTS investigation, HMRC have promised to increase the number of IR35 investigations per year while reducing investigation time. There is now a whole industry of professionals that offer IR35 review services to assist freelance contractors in assessing their IR35 position.

The decision to keep IR35 and to enforce it more strongly has had an enormous impact on freelance contractors across the UK. There is no doubt that the legislation is controversial and highly contested and is likely to remain so.

Has your business been effected by the introduction of IR35? Have you invested in having your contract independently assessed by an IR35 expert? Tell us about your experiences in the comments below!

Contract Tax

Having Professional Indemnity (PI) insurance can improve your IR35 profile. It is an all-important element of cover for businesses, protecting against claims of professional negligence.

Here at KPSol we have designed our core insurance package to cover the most common risks faced by freelance contractors. This includes Professional Indemnity, Public Liability and Employers Liability cover.

If you have any questions or need to discuss your requirements then simply call our friendly, professional team on 0124 236 2149 and we will be happy to discuss your needs with you. Or you can apply online to get instant cover.

Summarising the Autumn Statement

Autumn Statement

Unless you’ve spent the last few days hiding in a cave (and if you have, we’re not judging you) you’ll have heard something about this year’s Autumn Statement by now. After drip feeding out key policies and figures for the last week, today was the day that George Osborne delivered his statement in full. Traditionally a modest update on the state of the economy, this year’s statement felt like a second Budget in all but name. It’s fair to say that Osborne delivered it with two eyes firmly on the looming General Election in May, its weighty spectre creeping ever closer. BBC Political Editor Nick Robinson termed Osborne’s headline announcements as “real electioneering” and he wasn’t wrong.

This statement was Osborne’s chance to cut Labour off at the pass, and his attempt to gazump one of their key election cornerstones, the so-called ‘Mansion Tax’, led to the announcement that stamp duty will be undergoing a complete overhaul from midnight tonight. Essentially, the changes will allow those buying cheaper properties to pay less and those purchasing more expensive homes to pay more (12% for the most expensive houses), equalling a tax cut of £800m, which will benefit 98% of homebuyers. As always, the statement felt more like a game of high stakes brinkmanship than anything else, but the vast majority of the outcomes were positive. Alongside that headline news, below you’ll find a brief summary of the key figures and policies Osborne announced today (courtesy of the New Statesman), as well as an analysis of how exactly the changes might impact contractors and freelancers:


  • The economy is predicted to grow 3 per cent this year, up from the 2.7 per cent predicted in the budget.
  • Osborne will be borrowing £12.5bn more than forecast in the budget nine months ago.
  • The deficit is forecast to rise by more than expected over the next two years: £91.3bn this year and £75.9bn the following year.
  • The Office for Budget Responsibility says the deficit will pick up and fall faster than expected in following years, hitting a surplus of £23bn in 2020.


  • A “roads revolution”: £15bn to be spent on new road funding in England. This includes a 1.8-mile tunnel to relieve congestion by Stonehenge.
  • National Insurance abolished for employers that take on apprentices aged under 25.
  • Income tax threshold to increase to £10,600.
  • A new Sovereign Wealth Fund for the north of England, so that the shale gas resources of the north are used to invest in its future, and a commitment to “northern powerhouse” plans.
  • Cutting £15bn from the Whitehall budget, and the government will spend £10bn less this year.
  • Banks will pay £4bn more in tax over the next five years.
  • Freezing universal credit, working-age benefit for two years, and ending unemployment benefits for migrants who have no prospect of work.
  • Libor fines will continue to support military and emergency service charities, including buying new helicopters for the Great Western and Kent, Sussex and Surrey Air Ambulance.
  • Extend cathedral renovation fund.
  • Refund VAT for search ambulance charities and for hospice charities.
  • Extending theatre tax break to orchestras.
  • Air Passenger Duty on flights for under-12s scrapped from next year, and from 2016, it will be scrapped for all under-16s.
  • Funding the NHS: a pledge to spend an extra £2bn a year on the NHS.
  • Pensions: completing the reforms already announced, bringing total savings of £1.3bn a year.
  • Repayment of the national debt incurred by fighting the First World War.
  • 25 per cent tax on profits generated by multinationals from economic activity here in the UK which they then artificially shift out of the country (the so-called ‘Google Tax).
  • No increase in petrol duty.
  • A new garden city in Bicester, Oxfordshire: up to 13,000 new homes to be built there.
  • Flood defences: £2.3bn investment.
  • Helping SMEs: a near £1bn boost for small businesses.
  • Reform business rates: a review into the structure of this controversial tax on small firms. Double small business rate relief for another year.
  • An overhaul of stamp duty, coming into place at midnight tonight: allowing those buying cheaper properties to pay less and those purchasing more expensive homes to pay more, equalling a tax cut of £800m, which will benefit 98 per cent of homebuyers.
  • A postgraduate loans scheme: government-provided loans offering funding of up to £10,000.

George Osborne

So, what does it mean for freelancers and contractors? In general, Osborne’s business focus is good news for small businesses. The planned restructuring of business rates will be welcomed warmly, and the continuation of a freeze on fuel duty has obvious benefits for microbusinesses across the country. However, this government’s continued myopia with regard to improving the UK’s digital infrastructure (the pressing need to improve the issue of poor broadband in rural areas for example) is still a cause for concern.

The crackdown on tax avoidance should also be applauded, but we second Andy Chamberlain of IPSE’s comment that “any changes to umbrella companies [should] provide real benefits to those using these structures and do not inadvertently affect the genuinely self-employed.” The good news on this front is that the government’s review of umbrella companies should weed out the unscrupulous practitioners (those, for example, who offset expenses against income so their taxable income is below the national minimum wage). As Rob Crossland, founder of Parasol, noted: “This could be the landmark moment that policymakers finally take the time to properly understand our industry, differentiating between unethical cowboys at one end of the spectrum and compliant, professional providers…at the other. Any umbrella company that fails to offer genuine employment rights or pay the minimum wage deserves to be placed under the spotlight. Such practices are unacceptable – they do a disservice to workers, our sector and the UK economy as a whole.” If you’re just starting out on your own and are thinking of going through an umbrella company, then make sure to do your research before hand. Get feedback and make sure they’re trustworthy and reputable. If you find a company with your best interests at heart rather than their own then you’ll be in a good place.

In addition to the above, the small companies’ rate of Corporation Tax remains unchanged at 20% (for companies with profits under £300,000), still making it an attractive proposition for sole traders who are considering incorporating their business. There were a few changes made to National Insurance too. For limited company contractors, the lower earnings limit will increase from £111 to £112 from 6th April 2015. For sole traders, Class 2 National Insurance contributions will increase from £2.75 to £2.80 from 6th April 2015. Class 4 National Insurance Contributions are currently payable at the rate of 9% if your annual profits exceed £7,956. From 6 April 2015 this will increase to £8,060. The upper earning limit (at which point the rate reduces to 2%) will increase to £42,385 from April 2015 from £41,865 in 2014/2015.

There issues raised in today’s statement are sure to rumble on over the coming weeks, and the fact remains that the Conservatives will have borrowed £219bn more in this parliament than they promised in 2010. What’s more, a lot of the issues the freelance and contractor community had hoped to see raised (rate cuts for work hubs, for example, or tax breaks for training) were neglected. The abolishment of National Insurance for employers who take on apprentices under the age of 25 is welcome news, as is the promise of government backed loans for post-graduate students, but with HMRC’s VAT MOSS issue ongoing there’s still much work to be done. Head on over to the BBC and the Guardian for a further breakdown, and check in with a few of our favourite Twitter users to see what their thoughts were as the statement was unveiled.

Tax and the modern freelancer

Tax Return

You’ve established yourself as a freelance contractor; you’ve networked, you’ve set up your home office, and you’ve completed your first contract with a new client. Now it’s time for the best bit – receiving your first cheque.

Don’t get too attached to that number, though. You need to make sure you factor in the tax you owe, now that your tax isn’t being collected on a pay-as-you-earn basis. When you’re starting out as a freelancer, it’s really important that you get your head around the realities of your tax situation in order to ensure that you don’t incur the penalties associated with paying the wrong amount of tax.

Read on to find out the kind of things that are worth considering when it comes to tax and the modern freelancer.

Consider: Registering with HMRC

Anyone who sets up as a freelancer or as self-employed has to register for business tax with HMRC. This will allow you to provide your business information and set up records for self-assessment and National Insurance on behalf of your business. Failure to do this will result in financial penalties.

You also need to arrange to pay Class 2 National Insurance contributions as soon as you start freelance work. If your profits rise above £7,956 you will be required to pay Class 4 National Insurance contributions.

Consider: Your business situation

Are you a sole trader? Are you registered as a Limited Company? Or are you self-employed? Each status has an impact on the way you pay tax and how much. For example, if you are registered as a limited company, a preference for freelancers, then you will be subject to Corporation Tax and will have to provide a Company Tax Return at the end of your company’s accounting period. If you are self-employed or a sole trader then you must fill out self-assessment tax returns and submit them by 31st October and ensure you pay any tax you owe by the annual tax deadline of 31st January.

Consider: Keeping financial records

It’s vital that you keep detailed records of your financial activity as a freelancer. It’s good practice in general but it is essential for tax purposes. There are no hard and fast rules on the format in which your records can be kept – you can do it either on paper or electronically. If you’re not naturally organised, then it’ll pay to become so because maintaining records is one of the most important things you can do.

The types of details you need to record include profit and loss information, bank statements, orders, expenses and relevant communication. The list is extensive so start as you mean to go on and keep a record of all of your business’ incomings and outgoings to help stay on top of your tax obligations.

Consider: Working with an accountant

Some of us are more comfortable with numbers than others, which is why hiring an accountant to help you with your tax obligation is a personal choice. If you’re not comfortable with the numerous regulations of freelancer tax then working with an accountant could help translate some of the more obscure rules into a language you understand and help to save you money. If you do choose to appoint an accountant, try to source recommendations from fellow freelancers.

Tax can be a daunting subject to broach when you are starting out as a freelancer, but burying your head in the sand is never a good option. Stay organised, keep on top of your records and if you’re unsure about anything, ask the people in the know!

Do you have any tips on keeping abreast of your tax situation? Let us know in the comments below.


Wednesday 19th November sees the sixth annual National Freelancers Day; a day designed to put freelancing in the spotlight and to discuss the significant contribution independent professionals make toward the UK economy.

To celebrate a day just for freelancers, Kingsbridge are running a special competition on Twitter to show some love to freelancers across the UK.

Entering our competition is simple. All you need to do is Tweet us directly at @KingsbridgeProf and finish this sentence, ‘I love freelancing because…’ using the hashtag #NFD2014.

From the best answers we’ll pick five runners up, who’ll each win £20 in Amazon vouchers, and the winner will be the proud recipient of a brand new iPad mini 2.

Winners will be announced on Twitter on Friday 21st November. So get thinking, get creative and send us your best efforts to be in with a chance of winning!

A contractor’s guide to IR35 legislation

HMRC Building

The Intermediaries Legislation, or IR35 as it is more commonly known, has been the topic of conversation for many in the world of freelance contracting. With HMRC this year promising to reduce IR35 case investigation time, this key piece of legislation is now a topic that no contractor can afford to ignore.

What is it?

IR35 is a key piece of tax and National Insurance legislation that directly affects freelance contractors operating through a limited company. The aim of the legislation is to uncover what is known as ‘disguised employment.’

The legislation requires HMRC to create a ‘hypothetical contract’ between the end client and the individual undertaking the work by ‘removing’ the intermediaries of which the intermediary referenced in the legislation is the contractor’s limited company (often referred to as a ‘personal service company’ or PSC).

The reason the contract is hypothetical is that there are no contractual terms between the end client and the ‘worker’. The contractual chain is often End Client → Agency → PSC → Worker, but IR35 applies equally where there is no agency in the contractual chain because the PSC is the key intermediary.

The End Client and Agency are both engaging limited companies as it isn’t possible to ‘employ’ a limited company, and as such are off the hook as far as IR35 is concerned. The focus therefore falls upon the PSC which, in essence, will have failed to operate Pay As You Earn on its employee in respect of an engagement where HMRC can argue that IR35 applies. HMRC, in this situation, would be able to successfully argue that the hypothetical contract represents a contract of service (i.e. one that resembles an employment relationship).

What does this mean for the contractor?

When a contractor is trading through a limited company, the contractor can organise their remuneration in such a way that they receive a small salary and high dividends. The contractor therefore benefits from a slightly lower tax rate on the dividends, but the real saving comes from the fact that dividends do not attract employer or employee National Insurance Contributions (NIC). However, they should only do this for engagements that are deemed to be ‘outside of’ or ‘not caught by’ IR35.


Why is it important?

As a contractor, if your engagements are caught by IR35 legislation as being ‘disguised employment’, then your company becomes liable for the tax and NIC that would be due plus interest on the amount and even a penalty if HMRC can argue that you have not undertaken any form of due diligence. This obviously places a huge financial burden on a contractor, the effects of which could last for years.

How is IR35 applied?

When considering any kind of employment status issue, the first question asked will always be: “Is there a contract of employment?” The reason is that there is no legal definition of a “contract for services” (self employment), but there is sufficient case law to be able to determine what constitutes a contract of employment. Logically, if there is not a contract of service, then there must be a business to business relationship.

There are three key tests of employment which are used to investigate individual engagements, and these help to determine whether or not a contractor’s engagement falls within or outside of IR35 legislation.

The wording of your contract is key here. A genuine freelance contract will be a contract ‘for services’, whereas an employee contract will be a contract ‘of services’. This distinction is hugely important in proving that you are in fact a genuine business, providing a service to another business. In this instance, it pays to be diligent and have an independent IR35 specialist assess your contract.

Another test used to establish if a contract is IR35 friendly is the issue of control. A genuine contractor should have full autonomy over how the work they are contracted for is completed. There are also subsidiary elements to control that can be considered. It is sometimes the case that the contractor will have a considerable input into what the engagement will be (although that is usually the client’s decision), but often the contractor can determine the location. Perhaps the client has multiple sites and the contractor will determine from where he/she operates, or the contractor can work from their own offices. If a contractor has control over where the work is undertaken, they are also likely to have control over when it is undertaken.

Nevertheless, just because the client has determined the project and requires that the engagement must be undertaken on their site (whether due to security reasons or because that is where the equipment/people are), and that the site can only be accessed during certain times, this does not mean that the client is exercising control. The key issue is whether the contractor has control over how the work is undertaken.

There are two further important areas that are considered when assessing the IR35 status of engagement. The first is a right of substitution clause. If a contractor has a clause written in to their contract that a similarly skilled worker can replace them on a contract, the contractor is not obliged to provide their personal service. Having to provide one’s personal service is a key indicator of an employment relationship; having the right to substitute denies personal service and therefore indicates a self employment relationship.

The second is what is known as Mutuality of Obligation (MoO). An employee in a typical employer-employee contract will be paid each month and, in return, will be expected to work across a range of tasks at the discretion of their employer.  An arrangement such as this does not exist for limited company contractors engaged in a contract for services. Instead, a contractor will be engaged for a limited and specific project and when that contract comes to an end they are not obliged to remain working for their client. Indeed, if mutuality is to be fully denied, there should be no expectation that the contractor will work for the client on any given day or even be obliged to see an engagement through to conclusion.

Of course, IR35 investigations vary on a case by case basis and no preventative measures will ever cover every eventuality. However, it remains advantageous for all contractors to take the threat posed by IR35 seriously and remain prudent in ensuring that they can confidently prove that they are in business on their own account.

Having Professional Indemnity (PI) insurance can significantly improve your IR35 profile. PI insurance is an all-important element of cover for businesses as it protects against any claims of professional negligence.

Make sure that you are ticking an important business entity test off your list by ensuring that you are fully covered as a freelance contractor. At KPSol we have designed our core insurance package to cover the risks inherent in freelance contracting. This includes Professional Indemnity, Public Liability and Employers Liability cover; our product can help you avoid getting caught out by IR35.

If you wish to discuss your cover requirements then simply call our friendly, professional team at KPSol on 0124 236 2149 and we will be happy to discuss your needs with you. Alternatively, apply online to get cover instantly.